Week 7. D/C = discontinue or discharge

Many things can be discontinued: a specific medication, intervention, intravenous infusion no longer needed or working as it should, nurse-patient relationship, any relationship. Though of course something discontinued can always be started again, if needed, perhaps elsewhere. If there are no good veins left on upper extremities, the nurse starts digging into veins in a soft calf, even if the patient protests softly, "Ai, ai, ai."
An IV can be d/c, but only living, breathing people can be D/C (discharged): to go home, to a skilled nursing facility, to a specialized facility, or in some cases, back into the streets. Some people go home alone and perform self care, self medication, self everything. Some require the care of family. Some go to fancy nursing homes much like four star hotels. Some need around-the-clock monitoring and medical attention. Some have no idea what year or date or city or realm they exist in although everything seems to always smell faintly of urine and bleach. Some really don't have much to look forward to, besides the seasons when it's not too hot and not too cold to nap on a park bench and eat a half-eaten sandwich from a crinkled, greasy wrapper.

And these things also happened:
Someone streaked across G street in nothing more than too-small underwear and a paper protective gown.
Someone rolled up a piece of paper and snorted coffee creamer with it, then when caught, tried to explain it away (was merely trying to clean it up, etc.)
Someone, head hanging, cried great, big, adult tears for a notebook and writing utensil (many writers can relate).

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