OS = Oculus Sinister

Which of your eyes is evil? In Latin, oculus sinister (OS), the left one. 

Incidentally, the right eye, oculus dexter (OD), does have a television series about a serial killer named after it.

According to Rachel Spector, author of Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness, the evil eye is one of the oldest and most widespread cultural beliefs in the world. 

The evil eye may strike a victim from the eye or mouth, bringing about mysterious illness or misfortune. In different parts of the world, beliefs around the source of the evil eye vary--strangers in Mexico, kinfolk in Iran, witches in Greece, the devil in the Mediterranean, a deity in the Near East, a "low grade phenomenon" among Slovak Americans (Spector, 2017, p.79).

The injury, illness or misfortune caused by an evil eye may be prevented or cured with rituals, symbols, and talismans such as the ones below.


In western medicine, we study stress and its effects on the immune system, viruses, bacteria, carcinogens and other pathogens. Perhaps the agents of the evil eye (envy, hate, jealousy) described in folklore are not so different from invisible microbes that one becomes more susceptible to when subjected to stress (if people around one envies or hates one and it shows). Stress lowers the ability of the immune system to fight off invaders and proofread errors or silencing in DNA replication/transcription (that may lead to cancer).

These agents of "evil" may be tangible or intangible. People colonized or sick with pathogens may "strike" one by sneezing and coughing on one or touching the same surfaces or objects. Stress, excessive anxiety, and lack of support can affect one's work performance, leading to additional stress and decreased immunity in a vicious cycle.

So, what to do?
Avoid: set boundaries, reduce/resolve conflicts and negativity
Alter: apply feedback, improve, compromise
Adapt: be flexible, positive, openminded, look at the big picture
Accept: forgive, understand, let go

It's not much, but one can't walk around wearing protective gowns, masks and gloves, covered with a hundred dangling blue-eyed talismans all day.

Reference:
Spector, Rachel E., Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness (2017), 9th ed. Boston, MA: Pearson.

Comments

  1. I think evil eye of the mouth is a curse.
    😉

    ReplyDelete
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